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BZBI Presents: Dr. Alanna Cooper on "Windows without a Home"

BZBI Presents: Dr. Alanna Cooper on “Windows without a Home”

March 18 2021, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Join us as we welcome Katz Center Fellow Dr. Alanna Cooper for a unique talk about the architectural preservation of stained glass windows when synagogues are converted into churches, along with our almost unique experience of creating our stained glass windows in a former church.

In 21st century America, as synagogues dissolve in small towns and peripheral areas of the county, congregants face the dilemma of what to do with their sacred objects.  Stained glass poses a particularly difficult dilemma.  This lecture addresses the history of stained-glass windows in American synagogues, their aesthetic and emotional allure, and crucially, the question of their destiny when their congregations disband and their buildings are sold. Background on this lecture can be found in a recently published article in Tablet Magazine Windows without a Home. The cost is $10 for BZBI members and $18 for the community. Please note the date, which is one week later than originally scheduled.

You can register for this event here.

Alanna E. Cooper holds the Abba Hillel Silver Chair in Jewish Studies at Case Western Reserve University. Prior to this position, she served as director of Jewish Studies at CWRU’s Lifelong Learning program. She holds a PhD in cultural anthropology (from Boston University, 2000). She has an extensive publishing record in the academic press, and in the popular press her articles have appeared in Tablet MagazineThe ForwardJewish Telegraphic AgencyJewish Review of BooksLilith and Kveller. She is the author of Bukharan Jews and the Dynamics of Global Judaism (Indiana University Press) and is currently working on a second book, Preserving and Disposing of the Sacred: American Jewish Congregations.

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This part of a series featuring fellows at the The Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania—commonly called the Katz Center—a postdoctoral research center devoted to the study of Jewish history and civilization.

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